Healthcare Committee Data Breach in Örebro County, Sweden.

Healthcare Committee Data Breach

Healthcare Committee Data Breach in Örebro County, Sweden after sensitive personal data of a patient was published on the region’s website.

 

A healthcare committee data breach was uncovered after complaints were filed with the Swedish Data Protection Authority (DPA), concerning the publication of a patient’s personal data on the region’s website. According to an article by the European Data Protection Board, the complaints were concerning a patient admitted to forensic psychiatry whose personal details were found, through an audit, to have been published on the region’s website. The Swedish DPA found that the region’s website published sensitive data wrongfully, with neither legitimate purpose nor legal basis, nor eligibility for exemption from the proscription of handling sensitive personal data under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). As a result, the DPA has fined the Committee and ordered some changes to ensure compliance moving forward.

 

Swedish DPA audit uncovers lack of written instructions for publishing, increasing risk of a data breach.

 

The Swedish DPA performed an audit after receiving a complaint about the data breach in question and discovered that there were no written instructions in place for the publication of information on the Committee’s website. The Committee had depended solely on oral communication for passing on instructions for publication. The publication of this patient’s personal data was the result of those instructions not being followed. While it was accidental, the publication of that personal data was the result of insufficient organisational measures to ensure protection of personal data.

 

Healthcare Committee Data Breach results in a fine of 120,000 Swedish kronor and an order for corrective action. 

 

The Swedish DPA has ordered the Committee to establish written instructions and to institute measures to ensure compliance with those instructions for those who are tasked with publishing data on their website. In addition to ordering the Committee to bring its handling of personal data into full compliance under the GDPR, the DPA has also ordered the payment of a 120,000 Swedish kronor administrative fine (approximately 11,000 Euro). The published document resulting in the data breach has since been removed from the region’s website. 

 

What should have the Healthcare Committee done in order to avoid the breach?

 

-Have in place an adequate internal data protection policy providing written and clear instructions about how to process and secure the personal data held by the Committee. 

Pursuant to Article 24 GDPR “(1) Taking into account the nature, scope, context and purposes of processing as well as the risks of varying likelihood and severity for the rights and freedoms of natural persons, the controller shall implement appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure and to be able to demonstrate that processing is performed in accordance with this Regulation. Those measures shall be reviewed and updated where necessary; (2) Where proportionate in relation to processing activities, the measures referred to in paragraph 1 shall include the implementation of appropriate data protection policies by the controller”.

-Deliver relevant training to the employees. When it comes to reducing the risk of data breaches, it is paramount to train the staff so that they understand the new processes you have put in place and also the data protection rules behind them.

Why are the measures above especially important in this case?

The data compromised involves health information, which is a special category of personal data, therefore additional safeguards should apply, plus the bases for processing it are limited to some specific scenarios. However, it should be noted that the breach would have taken place even if the personal data published in their website was not sensitive, because there was no legitimate basis to make the information public.

Does your company have all of the mandated safeguards in place to ensure compliance with the GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018? Aphaia provides both GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018 consultancy services, including data protection impact assessments, and Data Protection Officer outsourcing. We can help your company get on track towards full compliance. Contact us today.

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