Amazon facing lawsuit in Germany, accused of breaking EU’s privacy laws.

Amazon facing lawsuit in Germany

Amazon facing lawsuit in Germany after being accused of breaking EU’s privacy laws against the EU-US Privacy Shield.

 

The global giant Amazon is currently facing a lawsuit and has been accused of breaking the privacy laws in Europe, according to this recent article from Politico. The company has been accused of using the infamous Privacy Shield despite its previous invalidation in Europe which has led to this lawsuit. The basis is that the Court of Justice of the European Union made clear that transferring data through the Privacy Shield was no longer allowed following July’s Schrems II judgment. This ruling invalidated the EU-US privacy shield. The reason for the invalidation was that the CJEU decided that shipping data outside of the EU put it at risk. According to the CJEU, US surveillance customs are more intrusive than they should be and go beyond what is acceptable for privacy. While Amazon understands that the Privacy Shield is invalid, it appears that they have continued to use this invalidated transfer mechanism.

Standard Contractual Clauses are still a viable option for companies needing to transfer data.

Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) are another option for the technological giants and are used by the likes of Google and Facebook. The difference is that exporting data from the EU using the SCC requires more supervision, and better ensures the safety of the data. While the SCC gives these companies an alternative, the clauses come with caveats, and are not entirely free of problems. Right now, the giant Facebook stands against the Irish data regulators regarding their use of the clauses.

EuGD takes legal action against Amazon.

EuGD (Europäische Gesellschaft für Datenschutz) decided to take action putting forth the formal legal complaint that escalated the conflict. The recent article by Vincent Manancourt, features a statement from Johann Hermann, the current head of EuGD, the group behind the legal complaint. “The [Court of Justice of the European Union] has made it clear that data transfers to the U.S. on the basis of the Privacy Shield are no longer permitted. If the world’s leading cloud company and largest e-commerce provider remains inactive for more than two months and ignores consumer rights, that is unacceptable,” said Mr Hermann, head of Europäische Gesellschaft für Datenschutz (EuGD). Moreover, the founder of EuGD, Thomas Bindl, said that taking the legal route was a decision made taking into consideration similar conflicts.

Despite the noise and controversy surrounding the conflict and impending lawsuit, it is still necessary to wait and see the developments in court. However, regardless of the result in the ruling, this will likely inspire greater vigilance and compliance on the part of companies who may also be transferring data out of Europe.

 

Do you make international data transfers to third countries? Are you affected by Schrems II decision? We can help you. Aphaia provides both GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018 consultancy services, including data protection impact assessments, and Data Protection Officer outsourcing. We also offer CCPA compliance services. Contact us today.

 

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