The EDPB and the EDPS have released a joint opinion on SCCs for international data transfers and SCCs between controllers and processors

The EDPB and the EDPS

The EDPB and the EDPS have released joint opinions on standard contractual clauses for the transfer of data within the EEA and internationally. 

 

Last month, the EDPB and the EDPS released joint statements on standard contractual clauses between controllers and processors and on standard contractual clauses for the transfer of personal data to third-countries. Both are referred to as ‘SCCs’ but it should be noted that they are two separate documents. This update is intended to bring the SCCs in line with the new GDPR requirements and provide a better reflection of the use of more complex processing operations, as well as provide specific safeguards addressing the laws of third countries and their effect on the data importer’s compliance. The Draft SCCs include, on the one hand, controller processor relationships within the EEA and, on the other, international data transfers. The EDPB and EDPS are pleased to note the specific provisions included many recommendations made by the EDPB, as well as several which address some of the main issues presented by the Schrems II ruling.

The EDPB and EDPS expressed overall satisfaction with both the Draft Decision and Draft SCCs for international data transfers. 

 

The EDPB and EDPS are both generally satisfied with the reinforced level of protection that the updated Draft Decision and Draft SCCs provide for data subjects. This update sought to bring the SCCs in line with the new GDPR while making special provisions for addressing third country destination laws on compliance with the Draft SCCs. The organisations noted that the Draft SCCs covered several of the supplementary measures recommended by the EDPB, while for some others, the organizations would like to see more consistency. There were specific recommendations made regarding the transfer of data on an international level. Many organizations will need to rely on these standard contractual clauses for international data transfers, particularly with the invalidation of the EU-US Privacy Shield. 

 

In analysing the Draft Decision and Draft SCCs between controllers and processors, the EDPB and EDPS made a few key suggestions.

While the EDPB and EDPS were generally pleased with the Draft SCCs presented, they expressed a request for the European Commission to clarify some specific clauses, with the aim of further clarifying the text and ensuring it is practical and  useful in day-to-day operations of the controllers and processors.. 

 

The EDPB and EDPS also suggested that the Annexes to the SCCs clarify as much as possible the roles and responsibilities of each of the parties with regard to each processing activity as any ambiguity in this regard could make it more difficult for the controllers or processors to fully meet their obligations under the accountability principle. The annexes are intended to provide a very technical explanation of how the SCCs will apply in specific situations. 

 

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, was quoted as saying: “The EDPB and EDPS welcome the controller-processor SCCs as a single, strong and EU-wide accountability tool that will facilitate compliance with the provisions under both the GDPR and the EUDPR. Among others, the EDPB and the EDPS request that sufficient clarity has to be provided to the parties as to the situations where they can rely on these SCCs, and emphasise that situations involving transfers outside the EU should not be excluded.”

 

The opinions presented by the EDPB and EDPS  will be considered by the Commission, together with the numerous other responses to its consultation on the SCCs. The European Commission will then formally adopt a decision incorporating the finalized SCCs and provide details for their adoption by organizations. Once finalized, the SCCs for international data transfers to third-countries will replace the existing sets of SCCs for transfers of personal data from within the EEA to other non-EEA countries that have not been recognized as providing an adequate level of data protection. As for the SCCs between controllers and processors, they will provide a standard for the parties, but its implementation will not be mandatory as controllers and processors will still be able to use their own clauses.

 

Does your company have all of the mandated safeguards in place to ensure compliance with the GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018 in handling customer data? Aphaia provides both GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018 consultancy services, including data protection impact assessments, and Data Protection Officer outsourcing. We can help your company get on track towards full compliance.

 

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