New EU ePrivacy rules update

New EU ePrivacy rules

The ePrivacy rules governing electronic communication data will be updated as agreed upon by EU Member States. 

 

Earlier this month, EU member states agreed upon a negotiating mandate for revised ‘ePrivacy’ rules. The rules on the protection of privacy and confidentiality in the use of electronic communications define cases in which service providers are allowed to process data from electronic communications or access that which has been stored on an end user’s device. The last update to the ePrivacy directive was in 2009, and as such, the member states agree that this legislation needs to be brought up to date with new technological and market developments. The new ePrivacy Regulation will repeal the current ePrivacy Directive and is intended to complement and characterize the GDPR. This regulation will become effective 20 days after its publication in the EU Official Journal, and two years later, will start to apply. Details can be found in this press release by the European Council

 

The revised draft regulation will cover content from electronic communication over public services and networks, as well as related metadata. 

 

This draft ePrivacy regulation will repeal the existing directive and will cover content transmitted via public services and networks and related metadata, when end users are in the EU. Metadata refers to the information on the time, location and recipient of the communication for example. Metadata is considered to be potentially as sensitive as the actual content of electronic communication. The rules will also cover the handling of data transmitted from machine to machine via a public network. 

 

Any electronic communication data will be considered confidential, except when permitted by the ePrivacy regulation. 

 

As a general rule, all electronic communication is to be considered confidential, and should not be processed without the consent of the user. There are, however, a few exceptions specifically outlined in the ePrivacy regulation. These exceptions include any processing for the purposes of checking for malware and viruses as well as for ensuring the integrity of the communication service. Provisions are also made for cases where the service provider is required to do so by EU or member states’ law with regard to the prosecution of criminal offenses or the prevention of public security threats. 

 

Metadata may be processed for very specific purposes, and with strong additional safeguards applied to it. 

 

Metadata may be processed for example for billing purposes or for detecting and preventing fraud. If users give their consent, service providers may use metadata to display movements of traffic to help public authorities develop new infrastructure when needed. This processing is also allowed in instances where users’ vital interests need to be protected, for example the monitoring of epidemics or in emergencies like natural and man-made disasters. In specific cases network providers may process metadata for purposes other than that for which it was collected. In those cases, the intended purpose must be compatible with the initial purpose for the metadata and strong specific safeguards must be applied to the processing. 

 

It will be possible for users to whitelist service providers, giving consent to certain types of cookies, from certain websites via users’ browser settings. 

 

Users will be able to permit certain types of cookies from one or many service providers, and change those settings easily in their browser settings. This should make permissions for cookies easier and more seamless for users, alleviating cookie consent fatigue. In addition, end users will be able to genuinely choose whether to accept cookies or any similar identifier. It may be possible for service providers to make access to a webpage or website dependent on consent to the use of cookies for additional purposes, instead of using a paywall, however this will only be allowed if the user is able to access an equivalent offer by the same provider, that does not involve consenting to the use of cookies. 

 

Does your company have all of the mandated safeguards in place to ensure compliance with the ePrivacy rules, GDPR, and Data Protection Act 2018 in handling customer data? Aphaia provides both GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018 consultancy services, including data protection impact assessments, and Data Protection Officer outsourcing. We can help your company get on track towards full compliance.

 

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